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Delivering a Successful Public Speech

Public speaking used to be something many people try to avoid and even dread. The trend seems to be changing now. As more schools, colleges and universities establish public speaking or debate clubs, the people of “Generation Y” and probably “Z” appear to be more confident to speak in public nowadays.

It is also heart warming to observe many multinational corporations establishing Toastmasters Clubs in their organization for their employees. These employers have realized that it is crucial to train their employees in the art of public speaking in order to uplift the self-confidence of their employees.

  • A dialogue to kill the fear of public speaking | Animesh Gupta | TEDxNITCalicut
    YouTube Video
    A dialogue to kill the fear of public speaking | Animesh Gupta | TEDxNITCalicut
During certain times in my life, I needed to deliver some public speeches. I therefore needed to learn the most effective way of doing this. In this article, I write about what I have learnt from reading many public speaking books and evaluating people delivering speeches. The knowledge that I acquired in the process has helped me to successfully deliver my speeches.

We may occasionally get overcome by nervousness before and during our presentations. This can cause our breathing to go haywire and eventually leave us gasping for breath. Your nerves will make your muscles contract and can make your chest feel heavy. Don’t be alarmed. This is natural. You are not going to get a heart attack.

When you feel nervous it is a good idea to speak slowly. Focus on breathing every six to eight words. Just take a few deep breaths before starting your talk to put yourself at ease.

When you commence your speech, ensure that you have a focal point in the room, which can act to give you reassurance. This could be a friendly looking person in the room. When you lose focus and forget your lines, just look at this friendly face for emotional support. By doing so, you will quickly bounce back on track.

Though I do plan and rehearse my speech thoroughly, I do not recite it word for word. It’s impossible to do so anyway. A wise man once said that there will always be 3 versions of your speech; the version you wanted to deliver, the version you delivered and the version the press said you delivered 🙂

Some orators prefer to just write down keywords or key subjects on paper which they keep in their pocket in case they need to look at it. This then ensures that they do not forget what they wanted to say. I prefer to write my speech word for word. By doing so, I can easily recycle my old speeches for future use by simply copying one paragraph from one speech and pasting it in another speech. This fusion enables me to create a totally new speech quickly.

However, do remember that while I write my speeches word for word, I do not recite it verbatim. The latter will make my speech sound robotic and boring.

If possible, I would prefer to start off my speech with a short joke, which can then act as an ice breaker. However, the joke needs to be relevant to the speech. I remember a speech I delivered many years ago. It was my last day at my place of employment. My colleagues had chipped in some money to buy me a farewell present. I then had to say a few words of appreciation to them. I knew many weeks in advance that this fateful day would arrive where I would have to deliver this speech. I felt quite stressed.

I was scheduled to speak for ten minutes in front of a hundred people. Here’s how I started. “I would like to thank everyone who has contributed to the purchase of this wonderful gift. Those of you who did not contribute to it, I will see you outside later.” This joke bought me some time and helped me to relax. As some of my colleagues laughed, I felt more confident in myself.

I will share my other insights with you in my subsequent articles. I wish you the very best in your public speaking journey. Our paths will cross someday. When it does, please tell me your success story.

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All the best to you in all facets of your life 🙂

Liven Your Audience in a Speech Presentation – 3 Ways

Let us explore 3 ways to liven your audience today.

I once encountered an employee who refused a job promotion because the new job required her to speak publicly. If she had accepted the new post, it would have meant a 30% increase in her salary. Nevertheless, her fear of public speaking got the better of her. Today, she remains in her old job, happy, despite having to survive with a low salary 🙂

I am sure you have heard about the old adage that people fear speaking in public more than they fear dying. Before you repeat this phrase to anyone, know the origins of this saying first. A dubious research called the Bruskin Report was done in 1973 on the 14 greatest fears of Americans. Apparently, Americans at that time were most fearful of public speaking. For some strange reason, the findings of this research are still ignorantly repeated by many public speaking trainers until today.

Maybe at that time, dying was an abstract concept and appeared far away while the podium was right in front of them. Nevertheless, if you fear public speaking, you really can “grab the bull by its horns” and maybe you won’t enjoy it, but after a while, you’ll be able to get through it easier. Half of your battle is won if you just knowing what you are going to say, and anticipating what others are going to ask. Simple eh?

Here are 3 ways you could use to liven your audience

Has a boring speaker ever put you to sleep? As a speaker, have you put your audience to sleep? Your head begins to nod as you battle with the urge to slide blissfully into the Land of the Z’s. Has your mind ever wandered aimlessly during someone’s boring presentation? Although you tried to listen intently, what you were really thinking about were the many tasks waiting for you in the office.

Well, this has happened to me too, more than I would like to admit. God knows how many people I’ve put to sleep during my presentations too 🙂

However, prevent it from happening to you when you are the presenter. The key to keeping your audience alert is to involve them in your speech. Oh, yes! Studies have shown that the more you involve your listeners, the more they will be alert. Why? Because your engagement will enable them to absorb your presentation through more than one “sense”. The “sense” I am referring to here is the sense of sound, smell, touch, sight & hopefully taste.

You can involve your listeners in many ways. I have listed 3 of my favorites here. Try them all. Some will work well with your presentation and that feel genuine to you. If it feels uncomfortable, it will look uncomfortable, therefore don’t use it. To a large extent, some of the 5 senses mentioned earlier will be naturally incorporated when you employ these methods.

1. High-five

This is one of my personal favorites but it depends on the seating arrangement & the nature of your speech. If you ever feel like the energy in the room is dull, you can uplift it by employing this technique. Simply ask a question. Ask, “Is this good stuff? Yes or yes?” Your audience will have no choice but to respond with “Yes”. Then say “Then, turn to the person on your left and give them a high-five and shout ‘This is good stuff!’” Most people will enjoy it. However, if you have anyone who does not want to participate, don’t worry about it. They probably have their own reasons and we respect them for their reasons.

In some cultures, women are not allowed to touch a man. Therefore, be sensitive to such situations and use the high-five appropriately. The high-five approach would be most suitable for a persuasive or motivational speech.

2. Do Exercises

I learned this technique from the famous millionaire T. Harv Ecker when I attended his “Millionaire Mind Intensive” workshop. He said, “Let your audience to do some work.” To achieve this, break them into small groups with people that they don’t know and give them a task that is relevant to your presentation. Later, ask them to share their findings with the rest of the group and thank them for doing so.

This method will work fine for workshops that involves small groups of people. You will experience a logistical nightmare if you try this with an audience of more than 50 people. If you really need to do this for large groups, then its best that you have a few assistants to help you.

3. Give Them a Gift

Reward your listeners for participating, and they will be more than happy to participate even more. Simply ask a question and when someone answers it (correctly or otherwise), get the audience to clap as a sign of encouragement. You can go one step further by giving them a gift if you are dealing with a small crowd. I find that chocolate works best. Chocolates have the ability to keep people mentally alert. You will find that it becomes a game and people will compete for the chocolate.

I don’t use this for all my speeches because as I mentioned earlier, it depends on the size of the crowd and seating arrangement.

There are numerous other techniques to prevent your audience from slipping blissfully into the Land of the Z’s. What is paramount is for you to cook up as many different methods as you can imagine that are suitable for your audience and for you as the speaker. Believe me, your audience will thank you for your original creativity.

I wish you well.

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The area under discussion “how to make a chart with the theme time and t” appears to be a perfect area of interest among our fans. Last week we documented somewhat a few requests via email to elaborate more on this issue. Rest assured that this central point has been satisfactorily covered either directly or in a number of ways at the link on top. If you did not find in particular what you were looking for at the link above, it’s most likely that we did not fully grasp precisely what you meant by this issue. The other likelihood is we may not be acquainted with the subject matter to speak on it in the first place.

All the best to you in all facets of your life 🙂

Time Management in Public Speaking

No one ever complains about a speech being too short. ― Ira Hayes You guessed right. Time and tide waits for no man.

Timeliness is a very important aspect of delivering a speech. By ending your speech on time, you are showing respect to your audience. If you have superb command of vocabulary, planned your speech objectives well and rehearsed it in advance, yo should not have any problems in ending your speech on time.

Under the best conditions, a person will concentrate on your speech for as many minutes as their age. A two-year-old child will listen for two minutes, a five year old will listen for five minutes, a fifteen-year-old child will listen for 15 minutes and so on up to the age of 20. After that, it tapers off. As a result, it is imperative to get to point within your allocated time.

I have not come across an audience who ever said “Man, I wish that speaker went over by 15 minutes.” Time limits are there for a good reason. Respect those limits to show you care about your audience.

Good Luck in your next presentation.

Now that you have gained some useful pointers on how to become a better public speaker, I encourage you not to stop here. Keep “sharpening your saw” by getting practical experience on public speaking. Grab the opportunity to speak in public as often as possible. The more stage time you accrue, the higher your self-esteem and confidence will become. Do purchase my book called Fearless Public Speaking at http://www.betterpublicspeaking.com/fearless-public-speaking-2/ This 11,500+ word book will give you more pointers towards becoming a seasoned orator. I look forward to that wonderful day in your life when you will become ‘complete’ and you will discover your true purpose in this world. May you discover it through your public speaking endeavors.

Complementary Thoughts on “how to make a chart with the theme time and t

The area under discourse “how to make a chart with the theme time and t” appears to be a perfect area of interest among our fans. Last week we documented quite a few requests via email to elaborate more on this issue. Rest assured that this focal point has been satisfactorily covered either directly or in a number of ways at the link on top. If you did not find in particular what you were looking for at the link above, it’s most likely that we did not fully grasp precisely what you meant by this issue. The other possibility is we may not be acquainted with the subject matter to speak on it in the first place.

All the best to you in all facets of your life 🙂

Attention Grabbing Technique for Public Speakers

There are many attention grabbing techniques we can employ to keep the audience glued to us. Here’s a surefire method: Find some excuse to get someone on stage with you. When a member of the audience is on stage, trust me, the rest of the audience will concentrate fully for the following reasons:

1. They probably want to see what is going to happen to a fellow member.

2. Maybe they are mentally preparing themselves to be up on stage too.

3. Some of them may be worrying to death that they may be asked to be up there.

Whatever the reasons may be, congratulations, you have grabbed their attention.

  • Attention Grabber in Public Speaking - Rizal Rashid
    YouTube Video
    Attention Grabber in Public Speaking - Rizal Rashid
However, you need to create some counter measures to tackle reason number 3. You need to keep your shy or sensitive audience from withdrawing from your program altogether because of the fear that they may be asked to stand up in front of everyone.

I’ve experienced this situation myself. Often I’m invited to a Tamil speaking function. As a Tamil leader, I am expected to address the audience in Tamil. Unfortunately, my command of the Tamil language is pathetic. Therefore, I cringe with embarrassment every time I face the possibility of addressing the audience in Tamil.

Similarly, your audience may also cringe with embarrassment for various unknown reasons.

Therefore, the technique that I employ is to first plant one or two ‘volunteers’ among the audience. These ‘volunteers’ would have been briefed in advance on what to expect and do. Once I get the ball rolling with these ‘volunteers’ the others will gain the courage to come forward voluntarily.

In order to minimize the chance of withdrawal you can also make the following statement:

In a moment I’m going to ask for a volunteer to come on stage with me. Don’t worry. No one will be forced to do so against their will.

If you have a high percentage of shy audience members, you will be able to feel their relief.

Once they are on stage, you can proceed with some sort of demonstration which you planned for. Make sure you give them some kind of prize. One of your products is usually good because it gives you a chance to mention it without using a hard sell. And just about always lead the audience in a round of applause for the demonstrator as they return to their seat.

Good Luck in your next presentation.

Now that you have gained some useful pointers on how to become a better public speaker, I encourage you not to stop here. Keep “sharpening your saw” by getting practical experience on public speaking. Grab the opportunity to speak in public as often as possible. The more stage time you accrue, the higher your self-esteem and confidence will become. Do purchase my book called Fearless Public Speaking at http://www.betterpublicspeaking.com/fearless-public-speaking-2/ This 11,500+ word book will give you more pointers towards becoming a seasoned orator. I look forward to that wonderful day in your life when you will become ‘complete’ and you will discover your true purpose in this world. May you discover it through your public speaking endeavors.

Supplementary Pondering on “how to make a chart with the theme time and t

The area under discourse “how to make a chart with the theme time and t” appears to be a ideal area of interest among our fans. Last week we acknowledged quite a few wishes via email to elaborate more on this issue. Rest assured that this region of focus has been adequately covered either directly or in some way at the link on top. If you did not find specifically what you were looking for at the link above, it’s most probable that we did not fully comprehend precisely what you meant by this matter. The other likelihood is we may not be well-informed to speak on this question in the first place.

All the best to you in all facets of your life 🙂

Managing Stage Fright and Vulnerability

Oh dear… your chest feels heavy, your throat is constricted and you feel like crying. You suddenly feel vulnerable facing the audience. The dignitaries are in the room and they expect a good performance from you. A sick feeling is rising and about to overpower your diligently rehearsed speech. The timing couldn’t be worse. This is your moment of truth. You need to portray strength, confidence and most importantly, professionalism.

Oops, too late. A tear trickles down your cheek and more bad stuff is coming.

  • Live Performance Tips : Live Performance Tips: How to Know the Audience
    YouTube Video
    Live Performance Tips : Live Performance Tips: How to Know the Audience
The anxiety of breaking down, fainting or weeping in front of strangers is a powerful and common fear. I understand how vulnerable you feel. Many speakers would react in the following ways:-

• Rehearse the speech intensively prior to the presentation for added confidence.
• Become invisible with no voice & fade into oblivion.
• Resign to fate and enjoy the flawed glory.

Which would you choose? Here a story of my friend, Adeline who shared her story with me.

Adeline was a successful public speaker. Her audience consisted of enthusiastic, enterprising and eager property investors. Her raving fans traveled from all nooks and crannies of Singapore to hear her speak.

One fine day after one of her talks, I had the opportunity to interview her. “Adeline,” I asked. “Have you always been such a captivating, charismatic and charming speaker?” Adeline was silent for a moment For once, she seemed lost for words. Tears welled up in her beautiful eyes.

With a quivering voice, she said, “I owe my success to an elusive holy man. I started my public speaking career in a disastrous manner. In my maiden speech, my mind went blank. It was the most embarrassing moment of my life. I had forgotten what to say. One week later, I had to deliver another speech. This time my stomach felt queasy. Within minutes of speaking, I had soiled my skirt. Immediately after my speech, I had to leave the auditorium because I smelled awful. And the story goes on…

To Cry Or Not To Cry Is The Question
These are some ideas you could use if you are in the same boat:-

• Shift the focus away from yourself and instead focus your attention on the audience. Remember, the majority of them want you to succeed. In most cases, they have nothing personal against you.

• Stop being angry with yourself for all your past failures in public speaking. As the stock market investors would say, “the past does not equal the future.” The more “failure” thoughts you harbor in your mind, the more likely your presentation will end up a failure.

What You Can Do Now
One of the quickest ways to learn how to handle something you find challenging is to observe how others do it. In Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP), it’s called Modeling. Here’s a good speech portraying Candy who handles her tears graciously. Go ahead and Model her.

http://www.ted.com/talks/candy_chang_before_i_die_i_want_to.html

Next time strong emotion arises in you when you speak in public, just notice it and don’t get caught up in the story. Instead, pause and connect through your eyes with another person to help keep you grounded. Pause and continue with your speech.

My friend, Toastmaster Azmi taught me a simple method to recover from such emotional overwhelming situations. He asked me to look out for a caring, cheerful & friendly face among the audience. The kind of supportive audience who will nod agreeably to you when you speak. Every time I felt like crying, fearful, etc, he asked me to look at that friendly face for emotional support. By doing so, I was able to recover faster and get on with the show.

I’ve cried a number of times when speaking in public. Guess what, the audience cried together with me! However, it is not good to leave the audience is a sad state when the speech is over. Therefore, it is always advisable to uplift their spirits and cheer them up before leaving the stage. It certainly feels like a storm has passed through leaving behind peace and tranquility. Your words will flow much better once the pent up emotions are released. “Better out than in” as someone infamous once said, and through my tears, I couldn’t agree more.

Good luck 🙂

Now that you have gained some useful pointers on how to become a better public speaker, I encourage you not to stop here. Keep “sharpening your saw” by getting practical experience on public speaking. Grab the opportunity to speak in public as often as possible. The more stage time you accrue, the higher your self-esteem and confidence will become.

Do purchase my book called Fearless Public Speaking at http://www.betterpublicspeaking.com/fearless-public-speaking-2/ This 11,500+ word book will give you more pointers towards becoming a seasoned orator. I look forward to that wonderful day in your life when you will become ‘complete’ and you will discover your true purpose in this world. May you discover it through your public speaking endeavors.

Supplementary Deliberations on “how to make a chart with the theme time and t

The area under dialogue “how to make a chart with the theme time and t” appears to be a ideal area of interest among our fans. Last week we acknowledged quite a few wishes via email to elaborate further on this topic. Rest assured that this region of focus has been adequately covered either directly or indirectly at the link on top. If you did not find specifically what you were looking for at the link above, it’s most probable that we did not fully comprehend exactly what you meant by this matter. The other likelihood is we may not be knowledgeable to speak on this subject matter in the first place.

All the best to you in all facets of your life 🙂