Better Public Speaking

Rss

  • youtube
  • linkedin

Using Appropriate Words in a Speech

The selection of appropriate words in a speech can be a challenge for some people. They get confused in the selection of different words during their speech. That is one of the reasons why they feel hesitant to speak in public. However, as a speaker, debater or a presenter, words play an important role in your overall speech.

They also act as tools for your impression while delivering a speech. If you are great at combining words together at the right spot, you for sure can achieve what is required in a best speech. It is not at all a big positive mark to avoid learning how to combine different words together. If you are good at combination of words, you could be more effective by learning them even in a more refined form. You need to learn some of the basics for how to use appropriate words in your speech.

Less Is More

If you want to remember your speech, you might go for having short sentences in your speech. Avoid long combinations of words that are separated by sentence connectors. Examples of sentence connectors include “and”, “so”, “actually”, “but”, “however”, etc. Such sentences are just too long to remember in their right order. You should know that long sentences just lose your audience’s attention towards your speech. Also, if you use long sentences, your audience gets confused whether to focus on the first part of your sentence or on the last part. Making use of short sentences in your speech helps you to interact with your audience easily. Therefore, it is highly recommended that you use short sentences to make your speech effective.

READ  Delivering a Vivid Presentation

Avoid Jargon

Another important point to focus at is to avoid the usage of terminologies, slang, abbreviations and jargon in your speech. However, if it is absolutely necessary to include jargon, do explain a little bit about the meaning of the word in order for your audience to follow your speech.

However, if you are addressing a specific group of people who are familiar with the jargon you plan to use, then it’s perfectly okay to use it. For example, if you are explaining a medical concept to doctors, you will be expected to use technical terms related to the medical profession.

Avoid Pause Fillers

More often, speech deliverers have the tendency of adding casual words like “umfh”, “aah” and “aee”. These words are distracting towards the audience. Usually, these words indicate that the speech deliverer is either confused or is not feeling comfortable enough to deliver the speech. You need to try to exclude these words as much as you can in order to prevent your audience from losing attention. A simple way to eliminate these pause fillers is to speak slowly. The mouth has the tendency to speak faster than the brain can think. When this happens, the brain suddenly goes blank…and guess what…in come the speech crutches such as “ah”, “um”, “er”, etc.

Avoid Foul Language

Some speech deliverers think that the usage of foul words is supposedly “cool”. Trust me, the usage of such language only goes to show that the speaker has got bad upbringing. A well-schooled speaker will have an arsenal of refined vocabulary up his sleeve which can be utilized to convey any message effectively.

READ  The History and Importance of Public Speaking

Your choice of words should ideally be generic in nature. This means that you should be able to deliver the same speech in front of your family, bosses, customers or friends without feeling embarrassed about your choice of words.

  • Difference Between Male and Female Japanese Speech: Select Vocabulary and Phrases (part 3 of 3)
    YouTube Video
    Difference Between Male and Female Japanese Speech: Select Vocabulary and Phrases (part 3 of 3)

Usage of Homonyms

Homonyms are words that share the same pronunciation but may have different meanings. An example of homonyms are stalk (part of a plant) and stalk (follow/harass a person) and left (past tense of leave) and left (opposite of right).

If you have an accent which is deemed foreign to your audience, it is best to avoid homonyms as you will most likely confuse your audience with your pronunciation. If you really have got no choice but to use a homonym, make your message clear by using hand gestures or body movement to emphasize your words.

If you will follow these basic rules in your speech, you would definitely excel in your communication skills. All the best to you in your next presentation. I wish you well.